After working on a project for a while with Agile and analyzing why some things went wrong, I came up with the following guidelines for our team. I printed them out and posted it on my cube wall so I would see it multiple times daily. I see these as supplements to or applications of the Agile principles. I don’t think these are unique to our project, so I’ll share them with anyone who can get value from them. Here is my list:

Do the right thing, even when it takes more time than the easy thing. In the best case, not doing the right thing creates debt. It is better to do a few things well than a lot of things poorly.

Obey the model. Perfectly. Models exist to provide rules of operation. Where rules exist, assumptions get made. When the model is deviated from, even in small amounts, assumptions get broken, unexpected behavior occurs, and complexity ensues.

Always keep it simple. Complexity is our #1 enemy. We must be diligently fighting this enemy wherever it silently creeps in. It is much easier to achieve the *-abilities when the thing is simple.

Prioritize. And revisit the priorities. Start with the understanding that you can’t complete everything. Work on the most important things first. Front-load the risky items. Priorities will help you decide what to leave undone. Revisit the priorities periodically to check if they need to be adjusted, especially due to new information.

Make the best customer experience. Don’t trade “what is best for the customer” with “what is easy for us”.

Think hard. And ask for advice. Challenge yourself to come up with a better plan, even after you’ve come up with a good plan. Benefit from the knowledge and diversity of those around you. There is value in personal interactions.

[Update 12 Dec 2014:] Any task which is more than trivially repeated, especially if accuracy is important, and can be reasonably automated, must be automated. The only way to scale without a huge increase in human resource cost and human errors is to automate. This also frees you up from the mundane to focus on high-value items. In the long run, the investment will not only be worth it, it will be necessary.

[Update 15 Dec 2014:] Break up the story into bite-size pieces. If the size of the story is too big, you won’t get it done, and it will just keep rolling over iterations. The way to eat an elephant is one bite at a time.